Finding Your Superpower™

It’s amazing what (and where!) a little concerted effort will get you! If you’ve been wondering what coaching with me would be like, but you’re:

  • worried about the cost
  • wanting to work more slowly on yourself
  • thinking that devoting 8 or 12 weeks to one-on-one coaching with me feels out of reach
  • just wanting a “sneak peek” behind the curtain to the foundations that I go through with clients …

Then, whatever is holding you back from coaching with me, or even reaching out to me at all, I’ve got a solution for you! 🎉

This past weekend, we officially launched the Finding your Superpower™ Self-Study and it’s awesome, y’all! 🥳

đź‘€ In the Self-Study, you’ll get:

– 4 In-Depth Modules with videos and activities, taking you on a journey of YOU!
– One-of-a-kind activities that help you create goals and plans for deep insight!
– Resources and Bonuses, which were only available through 1:1 coaching before!
– A Recommended Reading List to help you navigate all the feels and thoughts as you progress!

After you complete the course, you’ll have three clear mini-goals, a concrete plan for each of those goals, and best of all, more CLARITY! CONFIDENCE! COURAGE! INSIGHT!

You’ll also get the luxury of mini-videos of me, talking TO you, talking you THROUGH your concerns, laughing and sharing my personal stories so you know I understand, complete with supplemental information to help you apply the lessons you’re going to learn.

It’s time. YOUR TIME. Start this process today.

Contact me if you have questions or comments or concerns… otherwise, it’s time to make it happen! Start your new week (and June!) off with a bang! Ready to register? Visit: https://whatwouldsheilasay.com/p/self-study-superpower

#selfstudycoaching#empowerment#empowermentcoach#ondemandcoaching#selflove#selfcare#intentionalgratitude#nextstepsincareer#career#personaldevelopment#professionaldevelopment#lifecoach#professionalwomen

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About Sheila: An attorney, a social worker and an educator, she’s unlike any other person you’ve ever met. She thrives on a challenge, loves to solve puzzles and definitely loves helping make other people’s lives better – stronger – more efficient – happier. She tells terribly corny jokes, but maybe, just maybe, if you’re nice to her, and even laugh at her jokes, you’ll get something specially baked, just for you. Yep. For real.
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* I have two goals each day: (1) to make a stranger laugh and (2) to be a better person each day than I was the day before. I meet these goals. Every. Single. Day.

COVID’s Unexpected Gift

NOTE: This article (and the excerpt below) was written with Kim Milone, of Intentional Legal, and written for and published in the American Bar Association’s “ABA Law Practice Today” magazine. To read the full article, click here.

Legal professionals faced extraordinary uncertainties in the pandemic lockdowns of early 2020. With courts closed, trials paused, and clients at literal (two) arms’ length, we hunkered down. Whether it was at a kitchen table with a screaming toddler nearby, or alone in an apartment for months on end, the lockdown and the new “normal” that followed, presented lawyers (and law students) with an opportunity to reconsider their professional quality of life. COVID allowed us to slow down a bit, breathe, and imagine what our life could evolve into, post-pandemic.

To read the full article, click here.

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About the Authors

 
Kim L. Milone (left) is the founder of Intentional Legal, an online resource for ideas, inspiration and training for non-traditional alternative legal careers, and is COO and vice president of managed services for Decernis, which provides global regulatory consulting for food, consumer, and industrial products companies.

Sheila M. Wilkinson (right) is the Founder of SMWPLC / Law & Social Work, and splits her time between New Orleans and Brussels. As an attorney, social worker, educator and empowerment coach, Sheila helps lawyers reach their goals in their personal and professional lives with humor, transparency, and empathy.

Important Lessons as a Business Owner

One of the most important lessons I’ve learned as a business owner (lawyer, coach, and educator) is this:

In order to truly empower others, you must first empower yourself.

Sometimes that means taking a stand.

Or saying things others are afraid to say.

Or saying NO to that which does not serve you.

And it always means saying YES to what is truly meant to be in your life – people, opportunities, events, and more.

And, because it always bear repeating: I am proud to partner with BIPOC and LGBTQI+ owned & allied entrepreneurs to help them create, run, protect, and scale their businesses with confidence and grace. As a coach and as an attorney!

Too many business owners (and employees) try to serve everyone.

Here’s the truth: you can’t be everything to everyone. Once you understand this, you can truly show up as you’re meant to be, and help those you want to help.

As an attorney and empowerment coach, I have the unique opportunity to help individuals build the lives they really want. I do this in lots of ways:

  • As a business coach, helping you figure out what kind of business you want and help you build it and create it from the legal side
  • As a career coach, helping you find that job you truly love and don’t have to settle for (yuck).
  • Helping you transition your business or firm to a new system or structure, or a niche that you’ve been wanting to focus on but never seem to find the time to work through.

Whatever it is, I show up as you need me to show up, but the focus of everything I do is you empowering you – and asking the hard questions, giving you the grace and permission and support you need to listen to your intuition about what’s right for you.

If you need help with your business, your job, your contracts, your people – I’m your girl. Let’s chat!

#empowermentcoaching#businessasaforceforgood#businessowners

P.S. Today, I met my new business BFF! She’s everything I hoped she’d be. Thank you, Caitlyn MacMaster for showing up today, and for giving our time the love and laughs it deserved. I can’t wait to collaborate with you!

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About Sheila: An attorney, a social worker and an educator, she’s unlike any other person you’ve ever met. She thrives on a challenge, loves to solve puzzles and fix things and definitely loves helping make other people’s lives better – stronger – more efficient – happier. She tells terribly corny jokes, but maybe, just maybe, if you’re nice to her, and even laugh at her jokes, you’ll get something specially baked, just for you. Yep. For real.
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* I have two goals each day: (1) to make a stranger laugh and (2) to be a better person each day than I was the day before. I meet these goals. Every. Single. Day.

How Yoga Helped My Business

It’s easy to look at someone else and think they’ve got it all together.

Or think they know what they’re doing.

Or think they know how to be better or more of a badass than we are.

When I got married in 2015 (yep, I’m married, though I thought I was never ever ever ever ever ever ever EVER going to get married), I gave us a wedding present — a yoga intro session with Vera Lester (@verarocks). Vera was the only one I knew who taught yoga at the time. I’d tried yoga a long time ago (like, way back in my early 20s) and I didn’t care for it very much. It was too slow. I was too in my head. I hated it.

Of course, way back then, in my early 20s, I didn’t like myself or my life too much. So, you know. Instead, I was a Pilates girl.

I loved Pilates; still do. I feel like it’s the most bang for your buck if you really want to see a massive change in your body in a very short time. In fact, I actually just finished a 7 Day Back to Pilates Intensive with my favorite Pilates Instructor Julie (@communitypilates). Pilates is all about focus — focus on your core, focus on your posture, focus on your form. There’s not a lot of down-time. I liked that about Pilates. No time to think. Just do.

Back to Yoga.

So, in 2015(ish), we tried yoga, but it just didn’t work. Vera was a great teacher; we were just a bunch of klutzes. And we didn’t know how to be in our mind, alone, quiet, listening, while also not beating ourselves up for not knowing how to do a pose. Even just 6 years ago, that was not on the table. I could be quiet and read a book. I could be quiet and stare at the clouds. I could meditate to Oprah and Deepak’s 21-Day Meditation Challenges, but yoga? Frick. No way.

A lot happened in a short period of time (short meaning 5 years). I was finally grasping and willing to come into me — all of me. Not only did I start acknowledging all of the ways I still wanted to grow, but I accepted all my flaws, too, but not that they were flaws — they were strengths. That isn’t to say I didn’t intellectually know what was up, but emotionally, even after almost 40 years of therapy, I was still growing. I mean, that’s one of my two daily goals: to be a better person today than I was yesterday (the other is to make a stranger laugh).

So, why couldn’t I do yoga?

I kept being hard on myself. Kept thinking that to do yoga, I had to do the poses “right” and “perfect” and that I had to have a certain body type to do it. I always thought of all the ways I thought I was supposed to show up to yoga.

I never realized that doing yoga is literally about just showing up.

Getting there. Sitting down on your mat. And even if you stay in one singular pose the whole class, that’s.still.yoga. Yep. Still. Yoga. To lay in Savasana (Corpse Pose) is still yoga. I’m all about that.

So, fast forward to 2019.

I was in a great job, working at a place I loved, when suddenly, the rug got pulled out from underneath me. Suddenly, my awesome job I loved turned into a super stressful job where I was literally losing hair by the handfuls each day, where people taunted me and tricked me and worse, actively conspired to hurt me (more on that during this weekend’s chat on Instagram).

I needed something to help me re-center. Come back to myself. And be active at the same time, without putting too much pressure on myself.

And it was like a light at the end of the tunnel. The whisper.

Yogaaaaaah.

There was a small studio literally a 30 second drive away from my house. The class times were perfect. They told me to come as I am. No fancy clothes. No fancy mats. No special moves. Just show up.

And then I knew. I belonged there — @yaya4yoga

I didn’t want to put too much pressure on myself, but I knew if I didn’t schedule the class then and there, I wouldn’t go. So I did. And I went.

And when I walked in, it was strange. But everyone was nice. And quiet. And respected my space. And helped me find mine.

And my life has not been the same this past year.

And I am better for it. My clients are better for it. My dogs are happier for it. My relationships are stronger because of it.

I am beautiful because of yoga.

Joni (the founder of Yaya 4 Yoga) is a great teacher, and through Yaya, I met Dina (an amazing yoga instructor, artist and healer, who is smart not to have social, but happily will connect with anyone in person) and I met Erin (@erinsnowglow, a divinely intuitive yoga instructor, esthetician and founder of Zentilly Cove). I found Yoga with Adriene (@adrienelouise) and Yoga with Sarah Beth (@sarahbethyoga). In fact, I just finished Adriene’s 30 Day Breath Journey. That was fun!

And whenever I need yoga, I ask myself — who and what do I need … then I go to the teacher that will give me that.

There are tons of other yoga teachers I love, like the gorgeous Amy (@amosthemouse, who teaches Yoga for Big Bodies — dat’s me) and my little sister, Cat.

But if we’re being honest, above all, the yoga teacher I love the most is myself.

These wonderful creatures opened my eyes to all that yoga could do for me — mentally, emotionally, physically, intellectually — and all that yoga could do for those around me. I swear I haven’t drunk the Kool-Aid. It’s that yoga has helped me find strength to support myself, and to find solace in being present in and for my body, because it deserves it. I deserve it.

And yes, I might still be in Beginner’s Yoga, but the truth is, I plan to be there for a long time.

We are all just old souls traveling through time. Let’s give them what they need, when they need it.

So, today I invite you to celebrate with me. It’s my one year yoga-versary. How do you want to celebrate my day, but for yourself? What will you do today, to make your life better?

Love y’all. Happy Yoga-versary!

And, if you need someone to help you get on the track you want to a happier, healthier, richer life, I’m your girl. Let’s chat!

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About Sheila: An attorney, a social worker and an educator, she’s unlike any other person you’ve ever met. She thrives on a challenge, loves to solve puzzles and fix things and definitely loves helping make other people’s lives better – stronger – more efficient – happier. She tells terribly corny jokes, but maybe, just maybe, if you’re nice to her, and even laugh at her jokes, you’ll get something specially baked, just for you. Yep. For real.
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* I have two goals each day: (1) to make a stranger laugh and (2) to be a better person each day than I was the day before. I meet these goals. Every. Day.

Is time really on our side?

One of my favorite statements to refute is that there aren’t enough hours in the day. I’m not really sure what that means in the grand scheme of things. We all get 168 hours in a week. That’s 24 hours a day. Yet, still, people feel overwhelmed. Tired. Out of control. On the verge of a breakdown. Angry. Sad. Defeated.

I used to feel like that. I used to feel like I had no control over my life. And, well, it was true. I was a mere child – I didn’t have control over my life. My father passed away when I was 12 and the responsibility of life came on full force. Then, my mother got sick when I turned 14. I was her caretaker. And mine. And my sister’s. And then, my mother died when I was 16. I refused to change schools again; I finished high school with the help of a family friend who let me live with her and pay half the bills. Every weekend, no matter what my exam schedule was like or whether there was a JROTC competition, and regardless of whether I was overwhelmed, tired, angry or sad, I left school, walked two miles to the Greyhound station and took the bus to visit my sister – 90 minutes away. I stayed with her for the weekend, then I turned around and came back … and then I did it all over again. Every. Single. Weekend.

Then, graduation came and I went to work. Then, college. I earned scholarships. I saved. I stayed busy. And then that’s when the responsibility really heaped on – my sister turned 12 and we all agreed she would have the right to choose where she lived. And she chose to live with me. So, I began to raise my sister, eight years younger – all at a ripe age of 20.

I always worked full time, went to school full time, raised a child that was not mine. I volunteered for the morning carpool shift so that I wouldn’t have to leave work early in the afternoons. We woke up at 4:45 every morning and left the house by 5:20. We picked up the other girls and I dropped them off by 6:50. I got to work by 7:30 and stayed until 4:30. Then, if there was a recital or parent-teacher conference, I would go, and then on the other nights, I went to class. My sister would stay with friends or family members until I got home, and then that’s when the real work began: checking homework, making lunch for the next day, paying bills, doing laundry, balancing checkbooks, cleaning house, doing my own homework.

In other words – it was hard, but I made it happen.

When people tell me there aren’t enough hours in the day, I tell people this story. Inevitably, they always say, “I just don’t know how you did it. How did you do all that? I can’t even get all the errands done in a day.” My answer is always the same, “I just did it. Nothing special. You just do what you have to do.” Now that I’m older and wiser, I realized that in reality, that was not the case.

What actually happened is that as time passed, I learned how to work better, compartmentalize, prioritize, advocate for myself and for my time. I learned how to get everything done, still get 8 hours of sleep and live a happy life. I learned this from friends, from advisors, from professors and from reading. And now, I live on two continents, with clients on both sides of the Atlantic. I still make it happen … I keep these lessons with me so that I can achieve my wildest dreams. And somehow, that wildest dream has turned into helping others achieve theirs.

So, when you think there aren’t enough hours in the day, you’re right. There aren’t when you’re trying to shove 36 hours into 24. But, there are ways to make those 24 hours work for you, not against you. One of them is saying “no” to people. Another is planning. Or following up. Or breaking goals into tasks and then scheduling those tasks.

Having one reasonable, achievable goal for the day.* Scheduling time for yourself. Heck, I even schedule sleep!

I love teaching time management. Why? Because I get to tell people all the hard things I did, alone, and let them sigh a big sigh of relief, thankful for their support circle, and then, the best part – they get to take the shortcut. It’s not necessary for you to walk in my shoes to learn from my experience. You do, however, have to care enough to have the quality of life you want – and sometimes, well, that means doing the hard work now, to enjoy life later. It’s all about perspective.

It’s time to make it happen. For you. For your friends. For your family. For happiness. You deserve it. I know I do. If you want to start moving toward the life you deserve, I’m your girl.

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About Sheila: An attorney, a social worker and an educator, she’s unlike any other person you’ve ever met. She thrives on a challenge, loves to solve puzzles and fix things and definitely loves helping make other people’s lives better – stronger – more efficient – happier. She tells terribly corny jokes, but maybe, just maybe, if you’re nice to her, and even laugh at her jokes, you’ll get something specially baked, just for you. Yep. For real.
>>>>
I have two goals each day: (1) to make a stranger laugh and (2) to be a better person each day than I was the day before. I meet these goals. Every. Day.

These two simple words can change your life

It’s quite simple, really. The concept of appreciation is a common one, rooted in the values of building interpersonal relationships, of increasing personal and professional satisfaction and of growing a community. When we appreciate something, and I mean truly and intentionally appreciate something, that feeling can transcend most anything. Gratefulness can outweigh disappointment and soften the resolve of any hardened heart; this is what we hope to pass on to future generations.

In a recent post, I discussed the veracity of my own personal and professional growth through two daily goals: (1) to make a stranger laugh, and (2) to be a better person today than I was yesterday. Sometimes, in the course of my day, these goals are easier to achieve than others, and while I ultimately achieve them, sometimes the points rack up with only the tiniest bit of effort. It usually starts with a smile, and it always ends with expressing appreciation.

This morning, I was sitting at the light at City Park, at the cross hairs between Esplanade Avenue and City Park Avenue. I was the first car in line and an SUV pulled up next to me. We glanced at each other, stone cold in our thoughts for a moment, and then I read the side of the vehicle: New Orleans Fire Department. I rolled down the passenger side window and he quickly rolled his window down, too. “Hi, you okay?” he asked. Nodding, my response was simple, “yes, I just wanted to say thank you.” He smiled a huge smile, glowing instantly, chuckled a bit, and that warm feeling of appreciation fell over me, too. He nodded at me; “you’re welcome.” Then we rolled up the windows and went our separate ways. I drove all the way to the office with that feeling – the feeling of appreciation – the warmth of knowing I was grateful.

For anyone growing up in the US, the military is a big thing, regardless of whether it’s a positive, or even negative, influence. I don’t discount the fact that there are many in this world who have had negative experiences with the military or law enforcement. For me, though, growing up in a strict Roman Catholic home and within a law enforcement family, and having spent four years in Air Force JROTC in high school, I have a much different level of appreciation for the sacrifices that authority figures, particularly law enforcement and other community service providers, make every day. I know what it is like to watch a family member walk out the door for a police beat and not know whether he’ll return, fearing for his safety, and yet I also know what it’s like to feel grateful to see him again the next morning, knowing he was out in the community doing right by us.

I almost went into the Air Force; I wanted to be a pilot. And, while I did not join on account of my obligations to my younger sister, my heart still yearns for my dress blues, my officer’s cap, my name tag and perfectly shined shoes. I miss the structure, the routine, the giving of myself to a higher purpose – to protect, to prevent, to assist. To be clear, I am not advocating that the military is always good, or that law enforcement is always in the right. It’s not necessary to explore those philosophical and practical concepts to truly embrace what I want to bring to light. What it boils down to is simple appreciation. Simply being grateful of the structure, the purpose, the sacrifice another makes, even if, in fact, you do not benefit personally from the act of sacrifice itself.

I was raised to say please and thank you to everyone, no matter to whom, just as a matter of respect. At some point in my life, I also started to go out of my way to intentionally thank active service professionals in uniform when I saw them. I would yell thank you across a street or walk past someone just to thank them. And generally, I had restricted my extra “intentional” expressions of appreciation to just military personnel. Then, I grew into thanking law enforcement and from there, I grew into thanking community service providers. Now, when I see first responders, I am beyond feeling urged; I feel compelled. Compelled to thank them, show my appreciation, to embrace the feeling of gratefulness and to hope to change that person’s day, allowing them to take a moment to acknowledge their personal sacrifice in being a first responder, and to be grateful for being appreciated. That seems circular, I know. But just think about it. When we appreciate someone, a person will usually acknowledge our appreciation. What I propose is that in that moment, that single moment, where gratefulness knows no bounds – color, race, religion, national origin, ancestry, age, gender, sex – we can shift the energy of the world to the positive, if only for a millisecond, if only for a moment. We can change how we feel about our life. We can, actually, change the lives of other people, and in effect, change the world.

Last fall, I was walking with a friend in Brussels. Suddenly, I felt compelled to thank a pair of Belgian army personnel standing near Schuman Circle. As I crossed two streets and approached with tenacity, they braced themselves, pulling their automatic weapons closer to their bodies, ready for defense. I walked right up to them, looked both of them straight in the eyes and I smiled. I thanked them. Their shoulders fell, they softened – and without hesitation, they responded – “de rien.” It’s nothing. You’re welcome. Two simple words in response to two simple words. But in truth, it’s not just “nothing” that others do for us. My friend was floored that I would thank them, or even speak to them. She grew up in a culture that did not see the military in a positive way and that’s okay, because I explained to her that it’s not about what they stand for – it’s about the men and women who stand on that corner, or live on that base, or go to work each day knowing that they might be running toward an emergency, toward terror, toward un-safety, so that we don’t have to. The sacrifice they make is worth a moment of appreciation, just as an expression of appreciation to a parent or sibling or coworker would be.

So, next time you see someone – a fireman, a police officer, military personnel, an EMT, any first responder, or even the person checking you out at the grocery store or your coworker who simply “did their job” – try it: say “thank you” … thank you for keeping us safe … thank you for helping us in an emergency … thank you for being here today … thank you for your sacrifice. It’s easy to do this, takes only a moment, and has the capacity to change someone’s day. You’ll know that you did something for someone else, perhaps on a day when they really needed it, and honestly, you’ll feel better. You will glow at your own expression of appreciation, and not in a conceited way, either. That feeling, that glow, that gratefulness – it will grow. It will change how you look at the sacrifices others in your life make, for you, with you, alongside you. And in that feeling of appreciation, you will find a moment of extra happiness, and together, those moments will transform into a habit of gratefulness and your day-to-day will turn more positive.

When we lead by example, we change our community. And maybe, just maybe, that random person you thank will be the one who interviews you, or picks you up off the street when you fall, or perhaps they will be the one who changes your life somehow, some way … and if we’re lucky, our future generations will feel grateful for others and will feel empowered to change their world, too.

It’s time for you to do the same. So, start by thanking yourself for all your hard work today. Now, thank someone else who went out of their way to help you. Or, frankly, just thank someone in your circle. Everyone deserves a little love. And, if you’re having trouble finding gratitude in your daily life, then I’m your girl. Let’s chat.

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About Sheila: An attorney, a social worker and an educator, she’s unlike any other person you’ve ever met. She thrives on a challenge, loves to solve puzzles and fix things and definitely loves helping make other people’s lives better – stronger – more efficient – happier. She tells terribly corny jokes, but maybe, just maybe, if you’re nice to her, and even laugh at her jokes, you’ll get something specially baked, just for you. Yep. For real.
>>>>
I have two goals each day: (1) to make a stranger laugh and (2) to be a better person each day than I was the day before. I meet these goals. Every. Day.

How to say goodbye (to practicing law)

It’s January. It’s that time of year when everyone makes New Year’s resolutions and swears they’ll keep them. Most resolutions include better time management, more time for self, more time with family, more gym time, more vacations and less stress. Unfortunately, if the system within which we operate doesn’t change, then it is all the more likely that goals won’t be met. It’s simple logic.

I have a confession that I think most lawyers would agree with: while I enjoy practicing law, and while I love advocating in the courtroom for those who need a voice, practicing law generally sucks. We’re an adversarial bunch. We fight with each other within ethical boundaries (usually) and we zealously advocate for our clients with legally sound and factually based arguments (usually). Suffice it to say that a substantial majority of our time is spent each day trying to convince someone (clients, opposing counsel, judges, juries) of something (name anything) that those people really just don’t want to believe. And personality is key in convincing people. Anti-social and not good with people? It’s likely you won’t win people over. Social and outgoing and still not good with people? Still likely you won’t win people over. Tired of losing and tired of being tired? You definitely won’t win people over. There’s a delicate balance in practicing law and it often requires a great deal of investment – time, energy, emotion – to get it right.

Most lawyers I know don’t want to practice law anymore. They continue to do it because they own a house, own a car, own a boat, owe spousal support, owe child support and/or have a mountain of student loans that got them into the practice of law to begin with. It’s the perfect storm: debt, frustration, fighting on a daily basis and fear of failure. We’re creating a profession of havoc with each graduating class of students who believe that the only way they can be happy make money is to litigate. Forgive me, but I think that’s just wrong. Bill Quigley, a wonderful mentor and fabulous professor, once said to us, “We all are born with one bucket of crap. It’s your job in life not to carry two. When you graduate, don’t buy a car, a house, have kids, get married … wait five years … see if you still like practicing law, and if you do, THEN consider doing all of those things.” He wasn’t kidding. His sage advice echoes in my mind each day and I can’t thank him enough for it. Most of my peers went against that advice. Most of my peers are unhappy.

In case you’d forgotten (though I am not sure how you could have), lawyers are one of the top professions to die by suicide. Depression, alcohol abuse, drug abuse, personality disorders – they are at the forefront of our profession. I attended an amazing LADB CLE recently (“Compassion, Fatigue and Solutions”), during which the speaker told us of his troubles during his time practicing law. He said something that resonates with me still today: “Lawyers are the only profession rewarded for pessimism.” It’s true. We are brainwashed trained to think about every single possible thing that could ever go wrong and to account for it, write it into a contract or settlement agreement and hope that we never get called out for not being able to predict the future. Ridiculous, right? This kind of skill set breeds resentment, sadness and fatigue. We are encouraging people to be fearful of what the future holds, rather than encouraging them to embrace uncertainty in life and to live each day to its fullest. It is our moral and ethical obligation to take care of our peers; they are our fellow professionals. This is just one of the many reasons why Article 8 exists – to maintain the integrity of our profession – to help others when they need help the very most.

Want to know how to stop practicing law? First, you admit you have a problem. (You want to stop, but haven’t yet? That’s called denial). Then, seek out professional help to transition your practice into what you want, not what you think you wanted or what you think you should be doing because you spent a fortune on law school. The time is now. There might not be a tomorrow. Help your community. Help yourself. Act now.

If you’re struggling in the practice of law – personally, professionally, financially – I’m your girl. Let’s chat, because I know there’s a happier life waiting for you. Let me help you get it.

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About Sheila: An attorney, a social worker and an educator, she’s unlike any other person you’ve ever met. She thrives on a challenge, loves to solve puzzles and fix things and definitely loves helping make other people’s lives better – stronger – more efficient – happier. She tells terribly corny jokes, but maybe, just maybe, if you’re nice to her, and even laugh at her jokes, you’ll get something specially baked, just for you. Yep. For real.
>>>>
I have two goals each day: (1) to make a stranger laugh and (2) to be a better person each day than I was the day before. I meet these goals. Every. Day.